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Sofia Elidrissi
I have been exploring the themes of tradition and legacy in my family. I have always been enthralled by my grandparent’s tales of the old country and old -fashioned way of life, which they continue to maintain today. This work reflects the importance of tradition and the passing and receiving of knowledge in a family tree. I have been working from my own reference photography that was shot on my grandparent’s homestead in the north. The scenes are of still and solitary moments in a daily routine or visits. The roots are symbolic of both a connection between family members as well as a literal depiction of self –sustainable organic food, something which my family highly values. The moments are frozen in time, as if embedded in a fossil. 

Sofia Elidrissi

I have been exploring the themes of tradition and legacy in my family. I have always been enthralled by my grandparent’s tales of the old country and old -fashioned way of life, which they continue to maintain today. This work reflects the importance of tradition and the passing and receiving of knowledge in a family tree. I have been working from my own reference photography that was shot on my grandparent’s homestead in the north. The scenes are of still and solitary moments in a daily routine or visits. The roots are symbolic of both a connection between family members as well as a literal depiction of self –sustainable organic food, something which my family highly values. The moments are frozen in time, as if embedded in a fossil. 

SussedOil on canvas19”x17” (with frame)2012Kelsey CronjeThe main focus within my work is the exploration and development of character, and the examination of portraiture. I am attempting to give the viewer an insight into the person’s life, and their mentality, through one image. With the use of various mediums, characters are portrayed both through emotive gesture and line work. There is a great deal of material within a face, and is a relentlessly interesting area of focus for me.  
Sussed
Oil on canvas
19”x17” (with frame)
2012

Kelsey Cronje

The main focus within my work is the exploration and development of character, and the examination of portraiture. I am attempting to give the viewer an insight into the person’s life, and their mentality, through one image. With the use of various mediums, characters are portrayed both through emotive gesture and line work. There is a great deal of material within a face, and is a relentlessly interesting area of focus for me.  
‘UP IN THE MOST EXALTED REGIONS OF OUR ARCHITECTURAL ESTABLISHMENTS, SOMETHING OR SOMEBODY OBVIOUSLY ISN’T QUITE UP TOSNUFF’ – WAKE UP IT’S MORNING.MIXED MEDIA ON CANVAS 65” X65”2010Michael AbelI intend to examine and comment on the manifestations of power in both architecture and painting. While the two art forms are different physically, the idea and intent behind particular examples are cohesive. What fuels my paintings is the research of Post Modern societal relations in architecture to the ideologies of a governing body; and how I represent that research: through the [New York School] powerful paintings styles of Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. These two painting styles are used as an aid to present iconic architectural history and memory through accretion, erasure, layering, mass production, and commercialization. Subsequently, I attempt to establish a narrative by encasing the masculine, monumental painting style of abstract expressionism to a recognizable form or object. While Pop Art is inspired by advertising and how it establishes whole patterns of life: it is an appropriate art form to explore as the Iconic structures suggested are acting as architectural logos for the leading bourgeois. It is possible that I am producing iconic monuments to create aggressive dialogue and criticism about monuments.
‘UP IN THE MOST EXALTED REGIONS OF OUR ARCHITECTURAL ESTABLISHMENTS, SOMETHING OR SOMEBODY OBVIOUSLY ISN’T QUITE UP TO
SNUFF’ – WAKE UP IT’S MORNING.
MIXED MEDIA ON CANVAS
65” X65”
2010

Michael Abel

I intend to examine and comment on the manifestations of power in both architecture and painting. While the two art forms are different physically, the idea and intent behind particular examples are cohesive. What fuels my paintings is the research of Post Modern societal relations in architecture to the ideologies of a governing body; and how I represent that research: through the [New York School] powerful paintings styles of Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. These two painting styles are used as an aid to present iconic architectural history and memory through accretion, erasure, layering, mass production, and commercialization. Subsequently, I attempt to establish a narrative by encasing the masculine, monumental painting style of abstract expressionism to a recognizable form or object. While Pop Art is inspired by advertising and how it establishes whole patterns of life: it is an appropriate art form to explore as the Iconic structures suggested are acting as architectural logos for the leading bourgeois. It is possible that I am producing iconic monuments to create aggressive dialogue and criticism about monuments.
Mildred Lake # 54Original photograph manipulated by hand through drawing and painting and drawing processes24” x  38”2012Leya RussellAll the King’s MenA Series of Unique PrintsI begin with my original digital photographs which I then manipulate by hand through drawing and painting processes and presented in traditional printmaking format.These prints are titled based on their location and the time and date on which they were captured over the fall of 2011.  I  was until recently unaware of Mildred Lake, a 21 kilometer long tailings pond located north of Fort McMurray, Alberta. Tailings is material including sand, clay, bitumen and other toxins suspended in waste water left over from the bitumen extraction process. Learning more about the tar sands development in my province I felt increasingly drawn to this shifting place. This series of unique prints is what I have processed from my experience in this desolate land.Unlike most photographs which seem to claim some accurate portrayal of a place and time, these images are deliberately constructed, intentionally changed. Just as we are able to change and create images,  we are able to actively shape the world around us. We decide the world in which we live.
Mildred Lake # 54
Original photograph manipulated by hand through drawing and painting and drawing processes
24” x  38”
2012

Leya Russell

All the King’s Men
A Series of Unique Prints
I begin with my original digital photographs which I then manipulate by hand through drawing and painting processes and presented in traditional printmaking format.

These prints are titled based on their location and the time and date on which they were captured over the fall of 2011.  I  was until recently unaware of Mildred Lake, a 21 kilometer long tailings pond located north of Fort McMurray, Alberta. Tailings is material including sand, clay, bitumen and other toxins suspended in waste water left over from the bitumen extraction process.

Learning more about the tar sands development in my province I felt increasingly drawn to this shifting place. This series of unique prints is what I have processed from my experience in this desolate land.

Unlike most photographs which seem to claim some accurate portrayal of a place and time, these images are deliberately constructed, intentionally changed. Just as we are able to change and create images,  we are able to actively shape the world around us. We decide the world in which we live.
UnabridgedSilkscreen on Maidstone Paper22 1/4” x 29 7/8” 2011Mary M. CutbillMy current body of work interrogates the roles and functions of art, architecture, and space, both public and private, and examines perceptions of value within a dichotomous social framework in relation to the development of urban identities. Reinterpretations of existing or proposed imagery and structures direct my approach to urban branding. Photographs, maps, and blueprints provide inspirational components, which address incremental layers of geographical and historical significance. This exploration of abstract and realistic interpretations of urban branding manifests through silkscreen and mixed media elements. Concrete, metal, wood, and found objects constitute the primary component materials for my sculptural works. My expression of the dichotomies of visible and subliminal cultural, corporate, and institutional influences and relationships exposes the tensions and harmonies between identity and everyday habitation, providing opportunities to create a relevant urban iconography.
Unabridged
Silkscreen on Maidstone Paper
22 1/4” x 29 7/8”
2011

Mary M. Cutbill

My current body of work interrogates the roles and functions of art, architecture, and space, both public and private, and examines perceptions of value within a dichotomous social framework in relation to the development of urban identities.

Reinterpretations of existing or proposed imagery and structures direct my approach to urban branding. Photographs, maps, and blueprints provide inspirational components, which address incremental layers of geographical and historical significance. This exploration of abstract and realistic interpretations of urban branding manifests through silkscreen and mixed media elements. Concrete, metal, wood, and found objects constitute the primary component materials for my sculptural works.

My expression of the dichotomies of visible and subliminal cultural, corporate, and institutional influences and relationships exposes the tensions and harmonies between identity and everyday habitation, providing opportunities to create a relevant urban iconography.
ChristmasEtching16” x 21”2011Charlie RooneyRecently I’ve been focusing on conveying the theme of childhood through my images, and it’s an interesting topic because it’s something we’ve all experienced and been shaped by but it’s also something a lot of us stop considering.  When I print I try to abandon most of the perspective I’ve gained growing up, which is the opposite of what a lot of people try to bring to artwork, so I’m proud of that aspect of my work.  On the other hand, the idea of protecting childhood adds a lot of perspective to some of my prints, so I try to balance aspects of imagination and exploration with experience and reflection.  I’ve learned that when it comes to childhood, interpretation can be as varied as the backgrounds of each viewer, and this adds a complexity that I believe is successful.  To me, the imagination and belief and the promises and lightness of childhood will always be legitimate, and I hope that when people see the images I create they are able to recall what they loved most about being a kid.                  
ChristmasEtching
16” x 21”
2011

Charlie Rooney

Recently I’ve been focusing on conveying the theme of childhood through my images, and it’s an interesting topic because it’s something we’ve all experienced and been shaped by but it’s also something a lot of us stop considering.  When I print I try to abandon most of the perspective I’ve gained growing up, which is the opposite of what a lot of people try to bring to artwork, so I’m proud of that aspect of my work.  On the other hand, the idea of protecting childhood adds a lot of perspective to some of my prints, so I try to balance aspects of imagination and exploration with experience and reflection.  I’ve learned that when it comes to childhood, interpretation can be as varied as the backgrounds of each viewer, and this adds a complexity that I believe is successful.  To me, the imagination and belief and the promises and lightness of childhood will always be legitimate, and I hope that when people see the images I create they are able to recall what they loved most about being a kid.                  
In CaseAcrylic on Canvas30”x40”2012Heather BuchananBeneath fur and paint lies a creature, alluring and warm,evoking anxiety and attraction at the sight of its form,adhered to narratives; myths from far and near,pickled in the inescapable presence of fear.A creature within whom lives the familiar and patriotic,while remaining at a distance, othered and exotic,a nostalgic longing for childhood’s stuffed pet,and the confrontation of a present moment’s threat.Saddled to the looming burden of potent masculinity,suggestive of the creature’s voracity and virility,while foraging for roots - focused, serene,isolated in an open field of green.The creature longs to hibernate in quiet wintry duty,indulging in existence as an object of beauty,yet it wants to feed, it knows it must,capable of attacking with carnal lust.The creature and my work are alike in these ways,as consumed through the viewer’s gaze,more than a subject, the creature’s presence always there -there’s not a bear in every work, but every work is a bear.
In Case
Acrylic on Canvas
30”x40”
2012

Heather Buchanan

Beneath fur and paint lies a creature, alluring and warm,
evoking anxiety and attraction at the sight of its form,
adhered to narratives; myths from far and near,
pickled in the inescapable presence of fear.

A creature within whom lives the familiar and patriotic,
while remaining at a distance, othered and exotic,
a nostalgic longing for childhood’s stuffed pet,
and the confrontation of a present moment’s threat.

Saddled to the looming burden of potent masculinity,
suggestive of the creature’s voracity and virility,
while foraging for roots - focused, serene,
isolated in an open field of green.

The creature longs to hibernate in quiet wintry duty,
indulging in existence as an object of beauty,
yet it wants to feed, it knows it must,
capable of attacking with carnal lust.

The creature and my work are alike in these ways,
as consumed through the viewer’s gaze,
more than a subject, the creature’s presence always there -
there’s not a bear in every work, but every work is a bear.


“Sometimes, I See Things I Don’t Want To See.” (detail shot)
Lauren Little 
6’x4’  (72”x48”)
Collage on Masonite board
2011
Lauren LittleLately my work has involved the extensive use of pattern and repetition on a large scale. With this, my work communicates differently when viewed up close than it does when viewed from afar. My intention is to have an intrigue that draws the viewer close enough to read the work with a completely different dynamic at both distances. The idea is that something may seem one way at first glance and if the time is taken for a closer look, then an authentic complexity is surely revealed.A simple horizontal line from left to right, or from right to left to me depicts a sense of going back and forth; a journey from one end to another. By spending equal amounts of my life in both Calgary and my birthplace of London, England, I’ve always struggled with defining myself as a Calgarian or a Londoner.  There must be a space in between that I fall into. Not a void, but an active space.  Something about the repetition of lines creates that sense of activity for me. Since I spent the first half of my life in London and most of the latter part in Calgary, there will always be a constant journey between cities, which is the journey between memories and experiences and is also the constant journey between the young self and the present self.

“Sometimes, I See Things I Don’t Want To See.” (detail shot)

Lauren Little

6’x4’  (72”x48”)

Collage on Masonite board

2011


Lauren Little

Lately my work has involved the extensive use of pattern and repetition on a large scale. With this, my work communicates differently when viewed up close than it does when viewed from afar. My intention is to have an intrigue that draws the viewer close enough to read the work with a completely different dynamic at both distances. The idea is that something may seem one way at first glance and if the time is taken for a closer look, then an authentic complexity is surely revealed.

A simple horizontal line from left to right, or from right to left to me depicts a sense of going back and forth; a journey from one end to another. By spending equal amounts of my life in both Calgary and my birthplace of London, England, I’ve always struggled with defining myself as a Calgarian or a Londoner.  There must be a space in between that I fall into. Not a void, but an active space.  Something about the repetition of lines creates that sense of activity for me. Since I spent the first half of my life in London and most of the latter part in Calgary, there will always be a constant journey between cities, which is the journey between memories and experiences and is also the constant journey between the young self and the present self.

Page Twenty
Intaglio Print
22”x30”

Carrie Leung

My current theme of work is inspired by people and their unrevised story of their own journey through life. I’ve also been exploring ways to illustrate how time flips through us like books. The piece ‘Page twenty’ is a reflective surface for viewers to take a breath and recollect thoughts that were never written or recorded. The embossed shapes represent thoughts and emotions people consider before writing their story. This print is one of ten I’ve created thus far, each print has the same loose leaf page but with different arrangements in order to display a variant of personalities and mindsets. The shapes are also there to suggest the idea of being there but not being seen. Perhaps it is the things that we don’t say or do which reveal to us more about ourselves than the things that we actually do say and do.

Page Twenty

Intaglio Print

22”x30”


Carrie Leung


My current theme of work is inspired by people and their unrevised story of their own journey through life. I’ve also been exploring ways to illustrate how time flips through us like books. The piece ‘Page twenty’ is a reflective surface for viewers to take a breath and recollect thoughts that were never written or recorded. The embossed shapes represent thoughts and emotions people consider before writing their story. This print is one of ten I’ve created thus far, each print has the same loose leaf page but with different arrangements in order to display a variant of personalities and mindsets. The shapes are also there to suggest the idea of being there but not being seen. Perhaps it is the things that we don’t say or do which reveal to us more about ourselves than the things that we actually do say and do.

Barriers #4Digital C-Print20”x30”2011Amanda HuAs an emerging artist with a background in psychology, my need to gain understanding of how one operates within life constantly informs my work. My practice is based in the visualization of catharsis as well as the creative synthesis of my conceptual epiphanies regarding perception and functionality. In this way, I use photography as a self-communicative element, pushing beyond just didacticism into a form of abstract visual language. The works are often presented in large format, acting as a simulated window for the viewer to peer into and interact with the presented narratives, and in series to introduce a new perspective gradually, allowing the opportunity to assign a sense of value to these examples of alternative perception. Above all, my work acts as a constant catalyst for self-examination and the building of reflexive relationships with the viewer to ask and answer questions regarding anomalous states of mind.
Barriers #4
Digital C-Print
20”x30”
2011

Amanda Hu

As an emerging artist with a background in psychology, my need to gain understanding of how one operates within life constantly informs my work.

My practice is based in the visualization of catharsis as well as the creative synthesis of my conceptual epiphanies regarding perception and functionality. In this way, I use photography as a self-communicative element, pushing beyond just didacticism into a form of abstract visual language. The works are often presented in large format, acting as a simulated window for the viewer to peer into and interact with the presented narratives, and in series to introduce a new perspective gradually, allowing the opportunity to assign a sense of value to these examples of alternative perception.

Above all, my work acts as a constant catalyst for self-examination and the building of reflexive relationships with the viewer to ask and answer questions regarding anomalous states of mind.
"Imaginary Indian"Graphite and silkscreen on wood 22” x 22”2011Caitlin BodewitzMy series The Imaginary Indian addresses how the image of the Native has been portrayed and misrepresented throughout history and in the present day. Colonial attitudes have cloaked the aboriginal culture in a veil of myth and romanticism that has hidden us from the true essence and diversity of the Native heritage. I explore the concepts of fragmentation of identity, lineage, tradition, and an entire culture.
"Imaginary Indian"
Graphite and silkscreen on wood
22” x 22”
2011

Caitlin Bodewitz

My series The Imaginary Indian addresses how the image of the Native has been portrayed and misrepresented throughout history and in the present day. Colonial attitudes have cloaked the aboriginal culture in a veil of myth and romanticism that has hidden us from the true essence and diversity of the Native heritage. I explore the concepts of fragmentation of identity, lineage, tradition, and an entire culture.
Peonieswatercolor14”x6½”2002Vandy MidhaArt has been a major influence in my life for the past 20 years.  Although professionally, as an Interior Designer I had indirect exposure to the arts, I have still been fortunate enough to explore various mediums throughout my creative career, from watercolor, sculpture and oil to acrylic and mixed media.  I have a strong interest in drawing and architecture as well but my passion lies in painting.  My style was initially very realistic and controlled and has evolved over the years to become looser and more experimental.  More recently during my BFA training, I have had specific interest in cultural eastern themes in my paintings and the use of abstraction in my compositions.  The vibrancy of colors and muted depiction of village scenes, rituals and clothing have been especially intriguing to me.  My goal is to capture the feeling of a single moment or to depict an object that reflects the essence of India or Indian culture using abstract painting methods.  I hope to contribute to the cultural diversity in Canada through my art because it is an important part of who I am.
Peonies
watercolor
14”x6½”
2002

Vandy Midha

Art has been a major influence in my life for the past 20 years.  Although professionally, as an Interior Designer I had indirect exposure to the arts, I have still been fortunate enough to explore various mediums throughout my creative career, from watercolor, sculpture and oil to acrylic and mixed media.  I have a strong interest in drawing and architecture as well but my passion lies in painting.  My style was initially very realistic and controlled and has evolved over the years to become looser and more experimental.  More recently during my BFA training, I have had specific interest in cultural eastern themes in my paintings and the use of abstraction in my compositions.  The vibrancy of colors and muted depiction of village scenes, rituals and clothing have been especially intriguing to me.  My goal is to capture the feeling of a single moment or to depict an object that reflects the essence of India or Indian culture using abstract painting methods.  I hope to contribute to the cultural diversity in Canada through my art because it is an important part of who I am.
Mimesis VIIntaglio etching: combining two plates.Framed: 33 1/2”x 25 1/2”2011

Kathryn MathiasAs I move further from my old career in architectural drafting, and closer to a new more expressive life, I feel in transition.  Interested in how we use our cities’ spaces and resources and how we choose to incorporate the natural world in our built environment, I turn to these ideas for inspiration.  For example, I intentionally juxtapose the natural with its represented everyday objects.  This could be flowers and leaves incorporated in interior design elements like light fixtures, drapes, carpeting and glazed tile; or the patterns created on vases or book covers.  I don’t think we can or should turn back from urban life, but do need to maintain a balance between the contemporary aspect of this and staying connected to our roots in the natural world.  The facsimile of nature by man serves to remind us of what we need to protect; of the fact that we do not want to lose these roots, this connection.
Mimesis VI
Intaglio etching: combining two plates.
Framed: 33 1/2”x 25 1/2”
2011

Kathryn Mathias

As I move further from my old career in architectural drafting, and closer to a new more expressive life, I feel in transition.  Interested in how we use our cities’ spaces and resources and how we choose to incorporate the natural world in our built environment, I turn to these ideas for inspiration.  For example, I intentionally juxtapose the natural with its represented everyday objects.  This could be flowers and leaves incorporated in interior design elements like light fixtures, drapes, carpeting and glazed tile; or the patterns created on vases or book covers.  I don’t think we can or should turn back from urban life, but do need to maintain a balance between the contemporary aspect of this and staying connected to our roots in the natural world.  The facsimile of nature by man serves to remind us of what we need to protect; of the fact that we do not want to lose these roots, this connection.
Imprint IVIntaglio, watercolor, organic pigment, sanding18 ⅛” x 17 ⅝” 2011Tracy WormsbeckerInspired by my background in psychology and experience in developmental research, my work examines concepts related to the elusiveness of self-perception based on personal experiences.  I am fascinated by and constantly questioning what is left behind after experience.  This is heavily reflected in my current art practice as I work to create autobiographically-inspired imagery that rests somewhere between the ephemeral existence of a personal event and the lasting, yet shifting impressions that it makes.  Predominantly working with etching, my work uses the printmaking process as a metaphor for this varying effect that a particular instance can have on the self.  Through creating images by incising physical impressions of familiar objects (i.e. leaves, wood grain, fabric, etc.) into etching plates, I seek to produce a sense of permanence created from a temporary action.  Using a variety of printing and post-printing techniques, I then create multiple iterations with subtle differences to explore how the same image can be presented and therefore perceived in different ways.  Although my work undoubtedly examines the shifting perceptions of my own personal experiences, my aim is to explore general human processes.  By using my self-perception as a foundation, my work is exploring this fundamental human concept and invites viewers to reflect on how they themselves personally relate to the imagery that I present.
Imprint IV
Intaglio, watercolor, organic pigment, sanding
18 ⅛” x 17 ⅝”
2011

Tracy Wormsbecker

Inspired by my background in psychology and experience in developmental research, my work examines concepts related to the elusiveness of self-perception based on personal experiences.  

I am fascinated by and constantly questioning what is left behind after experience.  This is heavily reflected in my current art practice as I work to create autobiographically-inspired imagery that rests somewhere between the ephemeral existence of a personal event and the lasting, yet shifting impressions that it makes.  Predominantly working with etching, my work uses the printmaking process as a metaphor for this varying effect that a particular instance can have on the self.  Through creating images by incising physical impressions of familiar objects (i.e. leaves, wood grain, fabric, etc.) into etching plates, I seek to produce a sense of permanence created from a temporary action.  Using a variety of printing and post-printing techniques, I then create multiple iterations with subtle differences to explore how the same image can be presented and therefore perceived in different ways.  

Although my work undoubtedly examines the shifting perceptions of my own personal experiences, my aim is to explore general human processes.  By using my self-perception as a foundation, my work is exploring this fundamental human concept and invites viewers to reflect on how they themselves personally relate to the imagery that I present.
E.L.K.oil on canvas30”x27” 2010Andy Van DinhLove makes people do crazy things. Love makes me paint.www.andyvandinh.com
E.L.K.
oil on canvas
30”x27”
2010

Andy Van Dinh

Love makes people do crazy things. Love makes me paint.

www.andyvandinh.com
Sofia Elidrissi
I have been exploring the themes of tradition and legacy in my family. I have always been enthralled by my grandparent’s tales of the old country and old -fashioned way of life, which they continue to maintain today. This work reflects the importance of tradition and the passing and receiving of knowledge in a family tree. I have been working from my own reference photography that was shot on my grandparent’s homestead in the north. The scenes are of still and solitary moments in a daily routine or visits. The roots are symbolic of both a connection between family members as well as a literal depiction of self –sustainable organic food, something which my family highly values. The moments are frozen in time, as if embedded in a fossil. 

Sofia Elidrissi

I have been exploring the themes of tradition and legacy in my family. I have always been enthralled by my grandparent’s tales of the old country and old -fashioned way of life, which they continue to maintain today. This work reflects the importance of tradition and the passing and receiving of knowledge in a family tree. I have been working from my own reference photography that was shot on my grandparent’s homestead in the north. The scenes are of still and solitary moments in a daily routine or visits. The roots are symbolic of both a connection between family members as well as a literal depiction of self –sustainable organic food, something which my family highly values. The moments are frozen in time, as if embedded in a fossil. 

SussedOil on canvas19”x17” (with frame)2012Kelsey CronjeThe main focus within my work is the exploration and development of character, and the examination of portraiture. I am attempting to give the viewer an insight into the person’s life, and their mentality, through one image. With the use of various mediums, characters are portrayed both through emotive gesture and line work. There is a great deal of material within a face, and is a relentlessly interesting area of focus for me.  
Sussed
Oil on canvas
19”x17” (with frame)
2012

Kelsey Cronje

The main focus within my work is the exploration and development of character, and the examination of portraiture. I am attempting to give the viewer an insight into the person’s life, and their mentality, through one image. With the use of various mediums, characters are portrayed both through emotive gesture and line work. There is a great deal of material within a face, and is a relentlessly interesting area of focus for me.  
‘UP IN THE MOST EXALTED REGIONS OF OUR ARCHITECTURAL ESTABLISHMENTS, SOMETHING OR SOMEBODY OBVIOUSLY ISN’T QUITE UP TOSNUFF’ – WAKE UP IT’S MORNING.MIXED MEDIA ON CANVAS 65” X65”2010Michael AbelI intend to examine and comment on the manifestations of power in both architecture and painting. While the two art forms are different physically, the idea and intent behind particular examples are cohesive. What fuels my paintings is the research of Post Modern societal relations in architecture to the ideologies of a governing body; and how I represent that research: through the [New York School] powerful paintings styles of Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. These two painting styles are used as an aid to present iconic architectural history and memory through accretion, erasure, layering, mass production, and commercialization. Subsequently, I attempt to establish a narrative by encasing the masculine, monumental painting style of abstract expressionism to a recognizable form or object. While Pop Art is inspired by advertising and how it establishes whole patterns of life: it is an appropriate art form to explore as the Iconic structures suggested are acting as architectural logos for the leading bourgeois. It is possible that I am producing iconic monuments to create aggressive dialogue and criticism about monuments.
‘UP IN THE MOST EXALTED REGIONS OF OUR ARCHITECTURAL ESTABLISHMENTS, SOMETHING OR SOMEBODY OBVIOUSLY ISN’T QUITE UP TO
SNUFF’ – WAKE UP IT’S MORNING.
MIXED MEDIA ON CANVAS
65” X65”
2010

Michael Abel

I intend to examine and comment on the manifestations of power in both architecture and painting. While the two art forms are different physically, the idea and intent behind particular examples are cohesive. What fuels my paintings is the research of Post Modern societal relations in architecture to the ideologies of a governing body; and how I represent that research: through the [New York School] powerful paintings styles of Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. These two painting styles are used as an aid to present iconic architectural history and memory through accretion, erasure, layering, mass production, and commercialization. Subsequently, I attempt to establish a narrative by encasing the masculine, monumental painting style of abstract expressionism to a recognizable form or object. While Pop Art is inspired by advertising and how it establishes whole patterns of life: it is an appropriate art form to explore as the Iconic structures suggested are acting as architectural logos for the leading bourgeois. It is possible that I am producing iconic monuments to create aggressive dialogue and criticism about monuments.
Mildred Lake # 54Original photograph manipulated by hand through drawing and painting and drawing processes24” x  38”2012Leya RussellAll the King’s MenA Series of Unique PrintsI begin with my original digital photographs which I then manipulate by hand through drawing and painting processes and presented in traditional printmaking format.These prints are titled based on their location and the time and date on which they were captured over the fall of 2011.  I  was until recently unaware of Mildred Lake, a 21 kilometer long tailings pond located north of Fort McMurray, Alberta. Tailings is material including sand, clay, bitumen and other toxins suspended in waste water left over from the bitumen extraction process. Learning more about the tar sands development in my province I felt increasingly drawn to this shifting place. This series of unique prints is what I have processed from my experience in this desolate land.Unlike most photographs which seem to claim some accurate portrayal of a place and time, these images are deliberately constructed, intentionally changed. Just as we are able to change and create images,  we are able to actively shape the world around us. We decide the world in which we live.
Mildred Lake # 54
Original photograph manipulated by hand through drawing and painting and drawing processes
24” x  38”
2012

Leya Russell

All the King’s Men
A Series of Unique Prints
I begin with my original digital photographs which I then manipulate by hand through drawing and painting processes and presented in traditional printmaking format.

These prints are titled based on their location and the time and date on which they were captured over the fall of 2011.  I  was until recently unaware of Mildred Lake, a 21 kilometer long tailings pond located north of Fort McMurray, Alberta. Tailings is material including sand, clay, bitumen and other toxins suspended in waste water left over from the bitumen extraction process.

Learning more about the tar sands development in my province I felt increasingly drawn to this shifting place. This series of unique prints is what I have processed from my experience in this desolate land.

Unlike most photographs which seem to claim some accurate portrayal of a place and time, these images are deliberately constructed, intentionally changed. Just as we are able to change and create images,  we are able to actively shape the world around us. We decide the world in which we live.
UnabridgedSilkscreen on Maidstone Paper22 1/4” x 29 7/8” 2011Mary M. CutbillMy current body of work interrogates the roles and functions of art, architecture, and space, both public and private, and examines perceptions of value within a dichotomous social framework in relation to the development of urban identities. Reinterpretations of existing or proposed imagery and structures direct my approach to urban branding. Photographs, maps, and blueprints provide inspirational components, which address incremental layers of geographical and historical significance. This exploration of abstract and realistic interpretations of urban branding manifests through silkscreen and mixed media elements. Concrete, metal, wood, and found objects constitute the primary component materials for my sculptural works. My expression of the dichotomies of visible and subliminal cultural, corporate, and institutional influences and relationships exposes the tensions and harmonies between identity and everyday habitation, providing opportunities to create a relevant urban iconography.
Unabridged
Silkscreen on Maidstone Paper
22 1/4” x 29 7/8”
2011

Mary M. Cutbill

My current body of work interrogates the roles and functions of art, architecture, and space, both public and private, and examines perceptions of value within a dichotomous social framework in relation to the development of urban identities.

Reinterpretations of existing or proposed imagery and structures direct my approach to urban branding. Photographs, maps, and blueprints provide inspirational components, which address incremental layers of geographical and historical significance. This exploration of abstract and realistic interpretations of urban branding manifests through silkscreen and mixed media elements. Concrete, metal, wood, and found objects constitute the primary component materials for my sculptural works.

My expression of the dichotomies of visible and subliminal cultural, corporate, and institutional influences and relationships exposes the tensions and harmonies between identity and everyday habitation, providing opportunities to create a relevant urban iconography.
ChristmasEtching16” x 21”2011Charlie RooneyRecently I’ve been focusing on conveying the theme of childhood through my images, and it’s an interesting topic because it’s something we’ve all experienced and been shaped by but it’s also something a lot of us stop considering.  When I print I try to abandon most of the perspective I’ve gained growing up, which is the opposite of what a lot of people try to bring to artwork, so I’m proud of that aspect of my work.  On the other hand, the idea of protecting childhood adds a lot of perspective to some of my prints, so I try to balance aspects of imagination and exploration with experience and reflection.  I’ve learned that when it comes to childhood, interpretation can be as varied as the backgrounds of each viewer, and this adds a complexity that I believe is successful.  To me, the imagination and belief and the promises and lightness of childhood will always be legitimate, and I hope that when people see the images I create they are able to recall what they loved most about being a kid.                  
ChristmasEtching
16” x 21”
2011

Charlie Rooney

Recently I’ve been focusing on conveying the theme of childhood through my images, and it’s an interesting topic because it’s something we’ve all experienced and been shaped by but it’s also something a lot of us stop considering.  When I print I try to abandon most of the perspective I’ve gained growing up, which is the opposite of what a lot of people try to bring to artwork, so I’m proud of that aspect of my work.  On the other hand, the idea of protecting childhood adds a lot of perspective to some of my prints, so I try to balance aspects of imagination and exploration with experience and reflection.  I’ve learned that when it comes to childhood, interpretation can be as varied as the backgrounds of each viewer, and this adds a complexity that I believe is successful.  To me, the imagination and belief and the promises and lightness of childhood will always be legitimate, and I hope that when people see the images I create they are able to recall what they loved most about being a kid.                  
In CaseAcrylic on Canvas30”x40”2012Heather BuchananBeneath fur and paint lies a creature, alluring and warm,evoking anxiety and attraction at the sight of its form,adhered to narratives; myths from far and near,pickled in the inescapable presence of fear.A creature within whom lives the familiar and patriotic,while remaining at a distance, othered and exotic,a nostalgic longing for childhood’s stuffed pet,and the confrontation of a present moment’s threat.Saddled to the looming burden of potent masculinity,suggestive of the creature’s voracity and virility,while foraging for roots - focused, serene,isolated in an open field of green.The creature longs to hibernate in quiet wintry duty,indulging in existence as an object of beauty,yet it wants to feed, it knows it must,capable of attacking with carnal lust.The creature and my work are alike in these ways,as consumed through the viewer’s gaze,more than a subject, the creature’s presence always there -there’s not a bear in every work, but every work is a bear.
In Case
Acrylic on Canvas
30”x40”
2012

Heather Buchanan

Beneath fur and paint lies a creature, alluring and warm,
evoking anxiety and attraction at the sight of its form,
adhered to narratives; myths from far and near,
pickled in the inescapable presence of fear.

A creature within whom lives the familiar and patriotic,
while remaining at a distance, othered and exotic,
a nostalgic longing for childhood’s stuffed pet,
and the confrontation of a present moment’s threat.

Saddled to the looming burden of potent masculinity,
suggestive of the creature’s voracity and virility,
while foraging for roots - focused, serene,
isolated in an open field of green.

The creature longs to hibernate in quiet wintry duty,
indulging in existence as an object of beauty,
yet it wants to feed, it knows it must,
capable of attacking with carnal lust.

The creature and my work are alike in these ways,
as consumed through the viewer’s gaze,
more than a subject, the creature’s presence always there -
there’s not a bear in every work, but every work is a bear.


“Sometimes, I See Things I Don’t Want To See.” (detail shot)
Lauren Little 
6’x4’  (72”x48”)
Collage on Masonite board
2011
Lauren LittleLately my work has involved the extensive use of pattern and repetition on a large scale. With this, my work communicates differently when viewed up close than it does when viewed from afar. My intention is to have an intrigue that draws the viewer close enough to read the work with a completely different dynamic at both distances. The idea is that something may seem one way at first glance and if the time is taken for a closer look, then an authentic complexity is surely revealed.A simple horizontal line from left to right, or from right to left to me depicts a sense of going back and forth; a journey from one end to another. By spending equal amounts of my life in both Calgary and my birthplace of London, England, I’ve always struggled with defining myself as a Calgarian or a Londoner.  There must be a space in between that I fall into. Not a void, but an active space.  Something about the repetition of lines creates that sense of activity for me. Since I spent the first half of my life in London and most of the latter part in Calgary, there will always be a constant journey between cities, which is the journey between memories and experiences and is also the constant journey between the young self and the present self.

“Sometimes, I See Things I Don’t Want To See.” (detail shot)

Lauren Little

6’x4’  (72”x48”)

Collage on Masonite board

2011


Lauren Little

Lately my work has involved the extensive use of pattern and repetition on a large scale. With this, my work communicates differently when viewed up close than it does when viewed from afar. My intention is to have an intrigue that draws the viewer close enough to read the work with a completely different dynamic at both distances. The idea is that something may seem one way at first glance and if the time is taken for a closer look, then an authentic complexity is surely revealed.

A simple horizontal line from left to right, or from right to left to me depicts a sense of going back and forth; a journey from one end to another. By spending equal amounts of my life in both Calgary and my birthplace of London, England, I’ve always struggled with defining myself as a Calgarian or a Londoner.  There must be a space in between that I fall into. Not a void, but an active space.  Something about the repetition of lines creates that sense of activity for me. Since I spent the first half of my life in London and most of the latter part in Calgary, there will always be a constant journey between cities, which is the journey between memories and experiences and is also the constant journey between the young self and the present self.

Page Twenty
Intaglio Print
22”x30”

Carrie Leung

My current theme of work is inspired by people and their unrevised story of their own journey through life. I’ve also been exploring ways to illustrate how time flips through us like books. The piece ‘Page twenty’ is a reflective surface for viewers to take a breath and recollect thoughts that were never written or recorded. The embossed shapes represent thoughts and emotions people consider before writing their story. This print is one of ten I’ve created thus far, each print has the same loose leaf page but with different arrangements in order to display a variant of personalities and mindsets. The shapes are also there to suggest the idea of being there but not being seen. Perhaps it is the things that we don’t say or do which reveal to us more about ourselves than the things that we actually do say and do.

Page Twenty

Intaglio Print

22”x30”


Carrie Leung


My current theme of work is inspired by people and their unrevised story of their own journey through life. I’ve also been exploring ways to illustrate how time flips through us like books. The piece ‘Page twenty’ is a reflective surface for viewers to take a breath and recollect thoughts that were never written or recorded. The embossed shapes represent thoughts and emotions people consider before writing their story. This print is one of ten I’ve created thus far, each print has the same loose leaf page but with different arrangements in order to display a variant of personalities and mindsets. The shapes are also there to suggest the idea of being there but not being seen. Perhaps it is the things that we don’t say or do which reveal to us more about ourselves than the things that we actually do say and do.

Barriers #4Digital C-Print20”x30”2011Amanda HuAs an emerging artist with a background in psychology, my need to gain understanding of how one operates within life constantly informs my work. My practice is based in the visualization of catharsis as well as the creative synthesis of my conceptual epiphanies regarding perception and functionality. In this way, I use photography as a self-communicative element, pushing beyond just didacticism into a form of abstract visual language. The works are often presented in large format, acting as a simulated window for the viewer to peer into and interact with the presented narratives, and in series to introduce a new perspective gradually, allowing the opportunity to assign a sense of value to these examples of alternative perception. Above all, my work acts as a constant catalyst for self-examination and the building of reflexive relationships with the viewer to ask and answer questions regarding anomalous states of mind.
Barriers #4
Digital C-Print
20”x30”
2011

Amanda Hu

As an emerging artist with a background in psychology, my need to gain understanding of how one operates within life constantly informs my work.

My practice is based in the visualization of catharsis as well as the creative synthesis of my conceptual epiphanies regarding perception and functionality. In this way, I use photography as a self-communicative element, pushing beyond just didacticism into a form of abstract visual language. The works are often presented in large format, acting as a simulated window for the viewer to peer into and interact with the presented narratives, and in series to introduce a new perspective gradually, allowing the opportunity to assign a sense of value to these examples of alternative perception.

Above all, my work acts as a constant catalyst for self-examination and the building of reflexive relationships with the viewer to ask and answer questions regarding anomalous states of mind.
"Imaginary Indian"Graphite and silkscreen on wood 22” x 22”2011Caitlin BodewitzMy series The Imaginary Indian addresses how the image of the Native has been portrayed and misrepresented throughout history and in the present day. Colonial attitudes have cloaked the aboriginal culture in a veil of myth and romanticism that has hidden us from the true essence and diversity of the Native heritage. I explore the concepts of fragmentation of identity, lineage, tradition, and an entire culture.
"Imaginary Indian"
Graphite and silkscreen on wood
22” x 22”
2011

Caitlin Bodewitz

My series The Imaginary Indian addresses how the image of the Native has been portrayed and misrepresented throughout history and in the present day. Colonial attitudes have cloaked the aboriginal culture in a veil of myth and romanticism that has hidden us from the true essence and diversity of the Native heritage. I explore the concepts of fragmentation of identity, lineage, tradition, and an entire culture.
Peonieswatercolor14”x6½”2002Vandy MidhaArt has been a major influence in my life for the past 20 years.  Although professionally, as an Interior Designer I had indirect exposure to the arts, I have still been fortunate enough to explore various mediums throughout my creative career, from watercolor, sculpture and oil to acrylic and mixed media.  I have a strong interest in drawing and architecture as well but my passion lies in painting.  My style was initially very realistic and controlled and has evolved over the years to become looser and more experimental.  More recently during my BFA training, I have had specific interest in cultural eastern themes in my paintings and the use of abstraction in my compositions.  The vibrancy of colors and muted depiction of village scenes, rituals and clothing have been especially intriguing to me.  My goal is to capture the feeling of a single moment or to depict an object that reflects the essence of India or Indian culture using abstract painting methods.  I hope to contribute to the cultural diversity in Canada through my art because it is an important part of who I am.
Peonies
watercolor
14”x6½”
2002

Vandy Midha

Art has been a major influence in my life for the past 20 years.  Although professionally, as an Interior Designer I had indirect exposure to the arts, I have still been fortunate enough to explore various mediums throughout my creative career, from watercolor, sculpture and oil to acrylic and mixed media.  I have a strong interest in drawing and architecture as well but my passion lies in painting.  My style was initially very realistic and controlled and has evolved over the years to become looser and more experimental.  More recently during my BFA training, I have had specific interest in cultural eastern themes in my paintings and the use of abstraction in my compositions.  The vibrancy of colors and muted depiction of village scenes, rituals and clothing have been especially intriguing to me.  My goal is to capture the feeling of a single moment or to depict an object that reflects the essence of India or Indian culture using abstract painting methods.  I hope to contribute to the cultural diversity in Canada through my art because it is an important part of who I am.
Mimesis VIIntaglio etching: combining two plates.Framed: 33 1/2”x 25 1/2”2011

Kathryn MathiasAs I move further from my old career in architectural drafting, and closer to a new more expressive life, I feel in transition.  Interested in how we use our cities’ spaces and resources and how we choose to incorporate the natural world in our built environment, I turn to these ideas for inspiration.  For example, I intentionally juxtapose the natural with its represented everyday objects.  This could be flowers and leaves incorporated in interior design elements like light fixtures, drapes, carpeting and glazed tile; or the patterns created on vases or book covers.  I don’t think we can or should turn back from urban life, but do need to maintain a balance between the contemporary aspect of this and staying connected to our roots in the natural world.  The facsimile of nature by man serves to remind us of what we need to protect; of the fact that we do not want to lose these roots, this connection.
Mimesis VI
Intaglio etching: combining two plates.
Framed: 33 1/2”x 25 1/2”
2011

Kathryn Mathias

As I move further from my old career in architectural drafting, and closer to a new more expressive life, I feel in transition.  Interested in how we use our cities’ spaces and resources and how we choose to incorporate the natural world in our built environment, I turn to these ideas for inspiration.  For example, I intentionally juxtapose the natural with its represented everyday objects.  This could be flowers and leaves incorporated in interior design elements like light fixtures, drapes, carpeting and glazed tile; or the patterns created on vases or book covers.  I don’t think we can or should turn back from urban life, but do need to maintain a balance between the contemporary aspect of this and staying connected to our roots in the natural world.  The facsimile of nature by man serves to remind us of what we need to protect; of the fact that we do not want to lose these roots, this connection.
Imprint IVIntaglio, watercolor, organic pigment, sanding18 ⅛” x 17 ⅝” 2011Tracy WormsbeckerInspired by my background in psychology and experience in developmental research, my work examines concepts related to the elusiveness of self-perception based on personal experiences.  I am fascinated by and constantly questioning what is left behind after experience.  This is heavily reflected in my current art practice as I work to create autobiographically-inspired imagery that rests somewhere between the ephemeral existence of a personal event and the lasting, yet shifting impressions that it makes.  Predominantly working with etching, my work uses the printmaking process as a metaphor for this varying effect that a particular instance can have on the self.  Through creating images by incising physical impressions of familiar objects (i.e. leaves, wood grain, fabric, etc.) into etching plates, I seek to produce a sense of permanence created from a temporary action.  Using a variety of printing and post-printing techniques, I then create multiple iterations with subtle differences to explore how the same image can be presented and therefore perceived in different ways.  Although my work undoubtedly examines the shifting perceptions of my own personal experiences, my aim is to explore general human processes.  By using my self-perception as a foundation, my work is exploring this fundamental human concept and invites viewers to reflect on how they themselves personally relate to the imagery that I present.
Imprint IV
Intaglio, watercolor, organic pigment, sanding
18 ⅛” x 17 ⅝”
2011

Tracy Wormsbecker

Inspired by my background in psychology and experience in developmental research, my work examines concepts related to the elusiveness of self-perception based on personal experiences.  

I am fascinated by and constantly questioning what is left behind after experience.  This is heavily reflected in my current art practice as I work to create autobiographically-inspired imagery that rests somewhere between the ephemeral existence of a personal event and the lasting, yet shifting impressions that it makes.  Predominantly working with etching, my work uses the printmaking process as a metaphor for this varying effect that a particular instance can have on the self.  Through creating images by incising physical impressions of familiar objects (i.e. leaves, wood grain, fabric, etc.) into etching plates, I seek to produce a sense of permanence created from a temporary action.  Using a variety of printing and post-printing techniques, I then create multiple iterations with subtle differences to explore how the same image can be presented and therefore perceived in different ways.  

Although my work undoubtedly examines the shifting perceptions of my own personal experiences, my aim is to explore general human processes.  By using my self-perception as a foundation, my work is exploring this fundamental human concept and invites viewers to reflect on how they themselves personally relate to the imagery that I present.
E.L.K.oil on canvas30”x27” 2010Andy Van DinhLove makes people do crazy things. Love makes me paint.www.andyvandinh.com
E.L.K.
oil on canvas
30”x27”
2010

Andy Van Dinh

Love makes people do crazy things. Love makes me paint.

www.andyvandinh.com

About:

PUSH is a student-generated, faculty-juried exhibition that represents the commitment to a high standard of visual art education and practice held by both the faculty and students in the Department of Art at the University of Calgary. The Department of Art is committed to fostering learning environments in which its students can truly flourish as they push their artistic practice and conceptual development to new levels. This year's group of senior art students is thrilled to share their work, ideas and passion for the Arts with the greater Calgary community.